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Climate Change

Climate Change in Washington

Updated Clean Air Rule released

The Washington Legislature recognized the need to act on climate change and the severity of its threat to Washington and in 2008 established limits on the state’s greenhouse gas emissions. Ecology is required to review these limits and make recommendations regarding revisions using science from the University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group (CIG).

Ecology’s latest recommendations are in the Washington Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Limits report that was provided to the state Legislature in December 2016.

Existing state greenhouse gas limits:

  • By 2020, reduce overall emissions of greenhouse gases in the State to 1990 levels.
  • By 2035, reduce overall emissions of greenhouse gases in the State to 25 percent below 1990 levels.
  • By 2050, the state will do its part to reach global climate stabilization levels by reducing overall emissions to 50 percent below 1990 levels, or 70 percent below the State's expected emissions that year.
Recommended limits:
  • By 2020, reduce overall emissions of greenhouse gases in the State to 1990 levels.
  • By 2035, reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions in the state to 40 percent below 1990 levels.
  • By 2050, reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions in the state to 80 percent below 1990 levels.

Climate change in Puget Sound

A new report from the Climate Impacts Group, State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound, provides a comprehensive synthesis of relevant research on the likely effects of climate change on the Puget Sound region. Read the report >


What is climate change and what causes it? How is it affecting us, and how will it affect us in the future?

Cutting our greenhouse gas emissions is crucial to reducing the effects of climate change. Here's what we're doing in Washington and what you can do.

Climate change is happening now and will continue to happen. How are we preparing for climate change's impacts?

Climate change is altering the chemistry of ocean water, which has big impacts on Washington's marine life and economy.