Climate Change photo identifier

Climate Change

Climate Change: Disrupting our Economy, Environment and Communities

Extreme Weather

Click photo to see enlargement
Extreme weather - Recent climate modeling results indicate that "extreme" weather events may become more common in some regions, including the western U.S. Read highlights below or go to More about extreme weather...

More Photos: Storm damage | Forest fires | Dust storm (Idaho)

Droughts - Climate change from global warming affects the Northwest with recurring drought seasons. Multiple droughts since 1971 resulted in dry streams, withered and abandoned crops, dead fish, record low rivers and declining groundwater levels.

More about droughts...

More Photos: Dry riverbeds | Forest fires | Dry creeks Western WA | Dry creeks Eastern WA

Floods more extreme & often - In a future, warmer world, warmer temperatures will result in more winter precipitation falling as rain rather than snow throughout much of the Pacific Northwest, particularly in mid-elevation basins where average winter temperatures are near freezing.

More about floods...

More Photos: Flooding over roads | Transportation disruption | Flooded neighborhoods | Damage to personal property | Damage to public lands: destroyed campgrounds, river encroachment, washed out roads, collapsed roadways, damaged facilities and landslides.

More Landslides - Rain-soaked soils are prone to slipping and result in landslides affecting homes, businesses, power lines and transportation routes.

More about landslides...

More Photos: Property damage | Neighborhood destruction | Hillside collapse

More stormwater = more pollution - As water flows over the land, it carries with it all pollutants left on the ground or flowing off paved or hard surfaces (car oils, antifreeze, brake lining dust, pet and farm waste, fertilizers and pesticides, etc).

More about stormwater...

More Photos: Oily water | Stormwater drains to streams

Earlier river runoff - As the spring thaws come earlier and faster, peak runoff could move back weeks or months. This would result in less summer water when it’s needed most for crops, fish, cities and hydropower generation.

More about runoff...

Changing growing season - As the ecosystem changes, the historic linkages between predator and prey migrations, bloom times and pollinators can shift off center, causing population booms or crashes that affect the rest of the inter-connected system.

More about changing growing season...

Multiple emergency response needs - Extreme weather across the state can overtax the emergency response systems and funding.

More about emergency response needs...