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Air Quality Program

Small Business Assistance

Facts about Air Regulations

These fact sheets are intended to inform readers about the implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) on their businesses and how to achieve compliance through the use of pollution prevention methods and ideologies.

These fact sheets were created by the Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center, 513 First Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119, phone: (206) 352-2050, e-mail: office@pprc.org, WWW address: http://www.pprc.org/. Creation of these fact sheets was a joint project of the Small Business Assistance Programs in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington and was funded by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

U.S.EPA Automotive Refinishing Partnership Web Site


Understanding Regulations on Solvent Cleaning Equipment: What You Need to Know to Comply

If you own or operate any size solvent dip tank or parts washer you are required to comply with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for halogenated organic solvents by Dec. 2, 1997, as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. This means you must stop using the chemicals that are regulated under the rule, or install required controls on equipment and adopt specific work practices.

Do Your Process Materials Contain Regulated Chemicals? How to Read a Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) to Find Out

If you own or operate equipment that uses products that contain chemicals, it is your responsibility to determine if your company is required to comply with environmental regulations. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) typically are used by businesses to determine the health hazards and precautions for safe handling and use of process materials. You can also use a MSDS to determine if a product contains chemicals regulated by the EPA.

Emissions Estimating Worksheet

This worksheet will help you to do a mass-balance calculation of your annual emissions; this method is used to estimate the amount of chemicals in your products, and assumes 100 percent of the chemical is emitted. This is to be used with the list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (below).

Do You Use, Store, Manufacture, Distribute or Handle Toxic or Flammable Substances? What You Need to Know About Risk Management Planning

If you own or operate a facility that uses, stores, manufactures, distributes or handles regulated toxic and flammable substances, it is your responsibility to identify and assess your chemical hazards and carry out certain activities designed to reduce the likelihood and severity of accidental chemical releases. Risk Management Planning for the accidental release of chemicals, as required in Section 112(r) of the amended Clean Air Act, is imperative to protecting the health of your workers, the surrounding community and the environment.

Wood Furniture Manufacturing — What You Need to Know To Comply

If you own or operate a facility that manufactures wood products and has the potential to emit 10 tons of a single hazardous air pollutant (HAP) or 25 tons of a combination of HAPs annually, then you may have to comply with the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for the manufacture of wood products.

Shipbuilding and Repair — What You Need to Know To Comply

If you own or operate a shipbuilding or ship repair facility that has surface coating operations, the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990, has targeted your business for special requirements. Because shipyards and ship repair facilities use a variety of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) as solvents and carriers in marine coatings, the Environmental Protection Agency finalized a National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Shipbuilding and Ship Repair (Surface Coating) Operations on December 15, 1995.

Chromium Electroplating and Anodizing Tanks — What You Need to Know To Comply

If you own or operate a Hard or Decorative Chromium Plating or Anodizing Tank you are required to comply with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which has been written for these processes as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. In general, this means you must: limit tank emissions, perform monitoring, establish work practice standards, keep records, perform initial testing, and submit reports.

Aerospace Manufacturing, Repair Operations — What You Need to Know To Comply

If you own or operate an aerospace manufacturing and/or repair facility, the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 have targeted your business for special requirements. Because aerospace manufacturing and repair operations can result in emission of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) from process materials such as primers, topcoats, paint strippers, and cleaners, new requirements are in effect for: cleaning operations, primer and topcoat operations, depainting operations and chemical milling maskant operations

Rotogravure and Wide-Web Flexographic Printing — What You Need to Know To Comply

If you own or operate a publication rotogravure or package-product rotogravure and wide-web flexographic printing operation, the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 have targeted your business for special requirements. Because printing processes can result in emission of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) from process materials such as inks, new requirements include: emission Limits, compliance demonstration, record-keeping, and reporting.

Is Your Business Using Regulated Chemicals? — Watch Your Profits Evaporate

Compliance with regulatory requirements, worker exposure, permitting, installing capital intensive control equipment, waste disposal, and many other factors may pose a threat to your profitability and ability to compete in the marketplace. Pollution prevention, which reduces or eliminates waste at the source, will help you cut those costs and improve your ability to stay competitive and profitable.

The Information Age — Using the Internet to Find Regulatory and Pollution Prevention Information

If you own or operate a facility that uses regulated chemicals in your processes, maintenance and cleaning products, and other raw materials used in producing a finished product, then you may have to comply with regulations designed to protect the quality of the air we breathe. The Internet, especially the World Wide Web, has revolutionized how small business owners can obtain free information on regulatory requirements and pollution prevention. You just need to know where to look.

Evaluating Less Toxic Paints and Coatings ? — Get the Most For Your Money By Calculating True Costs

Many of the paints and coatings used by industry contain a variety of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), chemicals which are considered toxic and are dangerous to human health and the environment. Federal, state and local agencies regulate the use of these toxic substances, which often requires businesses to identify less toxic alternatives. Informed decisions about coating alternatives can be made by applying a simple cost comparison between coatings that you use currently and less toxic alternative products.

Download all 12 Business Assistance Fact Sheets (PDF files) at once: pprc_pdf.exe zipped, self-extracting file.



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