learn how to manage waste

manage dangerous waste

Designation Resources

Websites

WAC 173-303 Dangerous Waste Regulations

Dangerous Waste Test Methods

Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) 

EcoToxicology (ECOTOX)

Fish LC50 data must be derived from an exposure period greater than or equal to 24 hours. A hierarchy of species LC50 data should be used that includes (in decreasing order of preference) salmonids (including trout), fathead minnows, and other fish species.

Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB)

Biological Test Methods

Bioassay Testing on either laboratory fish or rats.
Bioassay or biological testing can be done on a representative sample of a waste with unknown components, Biological test methods are referenced in WAC 173-303-110(3)(b)
The actual test methods are described in Biological Testing Methods 80-12 for the Designation of Dangerous Waste, Ecology publication #80-12, revised June 2009. The test methods were developed by Ecology to meet the designation requirements of Dangerous Waste Toxic Criteria under WAC 173-303-100(5)(c)

Chemical Test Methods

Chemical testing can be done on a representative sample of a suspected dangerous waste with unknown components. Chemical test methods are referenced in WAC 173-303-110 (3)(c)
The actual test methods are described in Chemical Testing Methods for Designating Dangerous Waste, Ecology publication #97-407, revised June 2009.
Test methods referenced in Chemical Testing Methods are from:
Test methods referenced are for designation of the dangerous waste:

Characteristics

  • Ignitability
  • Corrosivity
  • Reactivity
  • Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP)

Persistence Criteria

  • Halogenated organic compounds including PCBs.
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
Refer to Chemical Testing Methods for Designating Dangerous Waste, for a more complete discussion of the above methods.
 

Using Knowledge Instead of Testing

Two ways to designate a dangerous waste are given in the Dangerous Waste Regulations, Chapter 173-303 WAC, Section -070(3)(c). The designator can either "apply their knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or the process used," or "test the waste."
Knowledge alone can be enough to designate a waste. Knowledge about a waste also limits the number of tests that might be done.
Refer to Designation Using Knowledge for more information.