Washington State Department of Ecology
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What to do if you have a slide


If you have a slide
landslide scarp and destroyed home

Contact local authorities
Engineering or public works authorities may or may not have the resources to assist individual property owners, but it is important that they be notified if the slide creates drainage problems on public property or threatens public improvements.

Get professional help
Consult a professional geotechnical expert for advice on the landslide and on corrective actions you can take. If a failed drainage system aggravated the slide, it is important to fix the drainage system before fixing the slide.
getting help
getting help

Experts and resources may be available
In the event of a large slide, experts and resources may be available to provide an initial review. Generally, slide repairs and more detailed analysis will be your responsibility.

Invest in prevention
To reduce the impact of landslides in the future, invest in prevention. Revegetate the area to prevent surface erosion. Inspect and repair all drainage systems. Contact your local emergency management office for more recommendations for your area.


Plastic is temporary
Plastic sheeting and visqueen is commonly used to keep rainwater and runoff from aggravating slide damage. Plastic is temporary, however. Plastic is also difficult to install without concentrating drainage in the wrong place.

Hydroseeding may not be enough
Hydroseeding involves the rapid planting of grass to reduce surface erosion. On steep slopes prone to erosion and gullying, hydroseeding may be ineffective. In addition, hydroseeding may hinder reestablishment of native, more erosion-resistant plants.
 
slide guide

Types of slides
Causes of slides
Slide signs
What to do
Prevention
FAQs
Getting help
Slide maps

Slide show
Shallow slides
Deep Slides
Large Slides
Benches
Geology
Insurance
Links

Hiring experts
Engineering
Drainage
Bulkheads
Retaining walls
Slope modification
Toe buttresses
Defensive approach
 
links

What to look for during and after heavy rains, USGS.
Where landslides occur, warning signs, and what to do.

Washington State Emergency Management.
Online emergency and disaster information.

King County Office of Emergency Management.
The King County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) provides disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.

Kitsap County Department of Emergency Management.
Kitsap County emergency and disaster information and links.

Mason County Department of Emergency Management.
Mason County emergency and disaster information and links.

Pierce County Department of Emergency Management.
Emergency information and links for Pierce County.

Snohomish County Department of Emergency Management.
Mission statement, structure and function.

Thurston County Division of Emergency Management.
Emergency and disaster resources for Thurston County.

Whatcom County Division of Emergency Management.
Emergency and disaster resources for Whatcom County.
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