Fishing Vessel Deep Sea Fire

Information on this site is considered to be accurate at the time of posting, but is subject to change as new information becomes available.
 

Last update 7/20/2012


OPERATIONAL UPDATES ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SUMMARY INFORMATION

Friday, July 20, 2012 11:00 am

Global Diving and Salvage has reported that the DEEP SEA has been successfully dismantled and that the vessel has been removed from the dry dock and loaded out for delivery to the scrap yard. The project is virtually complete. Only final delivery of scrap and the cleanup of the dry dock and equipment remain to be finished. See a view of the last piece being hoisted from the dry dock in the photo album.


Friday, June 8, 2012 5:00 PM

The Washington State Department of Health has issued the following statement:

“The Department of Health has reopened most commercial and recreational shellfish beds in Penn Cove that remained closed after a fuel spill in mid-May. All shellfish harvest remains closed at Madrona Beach after slight contamination was detected during the latest odor and taste tests.

“The Department of Health closed the area to harvest in mid-May after the fishing boat Deep Sea burned and sank, causing a fuel spill. Some areas in Penn Cove were reopened June 5. This week, state health officials worked with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on another round of sensory (smell and taste) testing in the closed areas. Other than shellfish from Madrona Beach, the results show mussels are not contaminated and are safe to eat.”


Thursday, June 7, 2012 5:00 PM

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources issued the following statement:

“The vessel Deep Sea, which was towed into Stabbert Maritime Yacht and Ship in Seattle on Wednesday, June 6, will be broken up and disposed of once the investigation of the cause of the fire is complete, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced today.

“The vessel caught fire on May 12 while illegally anchored on state-owned aquatic lands in Penn Cove on Whidbey Island; it sank the following evening. DNR has asked the King County Sheriff’s fire investigation unit to assist with determining the cause of the fire.

”DNR does not yet have a cost estimate to dismantle the vessel. The crews that raised the vessel from Penn Cove estimated the Deep Sea was filled with 30,000 to 40,000 pounds of mud and silt when it was hauled out. The mud will need to be removed from the vessel before a full assessment can be made of the extent of toxic substances on board, such as asbestos. The more toxic materials found, the more it will cost to dispose of the vessel and its contents.

“Disposal of the vessel will be paid for out of DNR’s Derelict Vessel Removal Program, along with a portion of the $3 million one-time Jobs Now Act funding appropriation from the 2012 Legislature. The shipyard will sell the scrap and credit the proceeds against the state’s costs for disposal. DNR expects the disposal operation to be completed sometime in July.

“Not counting the unknown costs to dismantle the vessel, the estimated state cost to handle the oil spill and raising the vessel have amounted to approximately $1.5 million.”
 


Wednesday, June 6, 2012 3:00 PM

The Deep Sea arrived at the Stabbert Maritime dry dock in Seattle this afternoon for dismantling.


Wednesday, June 6, 2012 9:00 AM

The Deep Sea departed Penn Cove shortly after 5 a.m. today, towed by the tug Taurus. The crane barge DB Oakland is following directly behind. The vessels are passing between Clinton and Mukilteo, and should reach Seattle by approximately early afternoon.


Tuesday, June 5, 2012 5:38 PM

The state Department of Health re-opened the shellfish harvest areas north of Mueller Park June 5 after test results showed samples taken from those areas are safe to eat. The area of Penn Cove south of Mueller Park will remain closed until additional test results shows that shellfish there also meet standards. All shellfish harvesting was closed May 15 due to the fuel leaking from the Deep Sea.


Tuesday, June 5, 2012 5:00PM

The Deep Sea is ready to depart, depending on weather conditions.

Winds forecasted for today could push wave heights to 4 feet, while safe towing conditions require waves under 3 feet. Tomorrow’s forecast predicts calmer conditions, and the Deep Sea’s expected departure time is 5 a.m. The tug Taurus will move the vessel.

Coast Guard Ecology officials yesterday determined that the Deep Sea presents no substantial threat of an oil spill. The Coast Guard today approved a tow plan for the vessel’s trip to Seattle.

The Taurus and Deep Sea will proceed at up to 6 knots, or about 7 mph. The Deep Sea could reach the Chittenden Locks in Seattle by early afternoon. The Taurus will deliver the Deep Sea to the Stabbert Yacht and Ship dry dock in Ballard for dismantling.

The DB General, the larger of the two floating cranes that lifted the Deep Sea, left Penn Cove late yesterday. The Deep Sea then moored to the smaller crane barge, the DB Oakland.

Meanwhile, environmental cleanup crews have started wrapping up efforts to remove oil from the water immediately surrounding the Deep Sea. They also began to remove some of the 5,700 feet of oil-spill containment boom and cleanup materials deployed for the lifting. The crews have conducted these operations since the vessel sank May 13 after a fire.
 


Monday, June 4, 2012 4:00 PM

The Deep Sea floated on its own today. It underwent inspections to determine its seaworthiness and to locate any remaining pockets of oil for removal.

The larger of the two floating cranes that lifted the Deep Sea is scheduled to depart for Seattle tonight. The Deep Sea is now moored to the smaller crane barge.

Ecology and Coast Guard Officials will decide when the vessel can be towed to a dry dock in Seattle for dismantling. That will occur as soon as weather and sea conditions allow. Tomorrow’s forecast predicts winds that will push wave heights to four feet. Safe towing conditions require waves under three feet.

Meanwhile, environmental cleanup crews continued efforts to remove oil from the water immediately surrounding the Deep Sea. Oil trapped in the hull when the vessel rested on its side floated to the surface when floating cranes set the Deep Sea upright before raising it, yesterday.
 


Sunday, June 3, 2012 4:00PM

The Deep Sea is riding higher on the water as two pumps discharge 800-1,000 gallons of water each per minute. Two floating cranes righted and lifted the former fishing vessel from the bottom of Penn Cove on Sunday, June 3, 2012.

The Deep Sea rested with a 45-degree list to the left in 60 feet of water when the cranes started pulling at about 9:30 a.m. After righting the vessel to about 5 degrees, the crane lift paused with the deck still 15-20 feet below the surface. Divers removed tons of silt that covered the deck. The entire deck cleared the surface about 1:30. Pumping began soon after.

If the Deep Sea proves safe and stable enough, a tugboat will tow the vessel for dismantling at the Stabbert Maritime Yacht & Ship dry dock in Seattle. If the Deep Sea cannot be towed it will be placed on a barge. Either way, the trip to Seattle is expected on Monday, June 4.
 


Sunday, June 3, 2012 1:45 PM

The Deep Sea reached the surface of Penn Cove at about 1:30 p.m. The vessel remains supported by two floating cranes. Crews will pump water out of the hull. Next: inspections to determine whether the vessel can safely float for a tow to a shipyard for dismantling.


Sunday, June 3, 2012 11:32 AM

The Deep Sea is clear of the bottom of Penn Cove, as two crane barges slowly and delicately bring the sunken fishing boat toward the surface of Penn Cove. The lift has paused so that divers can clear silt that covers the deck.

The larger crane – holding the back and center of the vessel – is sustaining a load of 260 tons. The smaller crane has 70 tons of load, as it holds the front end.

The ship now lists only five degrees to its left side. Some masts at the front of the vessel are visible above the surface.

When the deck is at the surface, crews will begin to pump water out of the vessel to prepare for further lifting.
 


Sunday, June 3, 2012 10:15 AM

Divers and crane operators – working under contract for the Department of Ecology – have rigged the Deep Sea for righting and lifting it from the bottom of Penn Cove, near Coupeville on Whidbey Island.

Crews have verified that all connections are secure, and the two floating cranes to be used in the lift have taken up load. Winches on the larger crane barge have begun to pull on connections to place the vessel upright from its position 45 degrees to the left.
 


Thursday, May 31, 2012

Divers reached a significant milestone today in preparing to raise the sunken fishing vessel Deep Sea from the bottom of Penn Cove, near Coupeville on Whidbey Island. They were able to insert the lifting chain under the stern section of the boat and secure it in place.

With the stern lifting chain in place, divers for Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. (Global) will now move to the bow of the vessel and work to remove the starboard (right side) anchor and chain. Once these are removed, crews will rig another lifting chain in the bow and hoist the bow of the vessel toward the surface to create space for divers to run "messenger line" under the hull at the center of ship. This will enable the placing of a heavy lifting chain.

NRC-Environmental Services (NRC-ES) crews continued to tend oil-spill containment boom and to deploy oil-spill cleanup materials in response to sheen - a thin oil coating - visible in surrounding waters. Most of the sheen is too thin to remove, and dissipates by evaporation and natural breakdown. The sheen comes from small amounts of oil that escape from the Deep Sea.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the U.S. Coast Guard, Washington departments of Ecology (Ecology) and Natural Resources (DNR), Island County Department of Emergency Management, Global and NRC-ES.

State agencies had incurred costs estimated at $800,000 as of May 31on the Deep Sea response. Ecology projects the state will spend approximately $1,571,000 to raise and remove the vessel. The state will seek reimbursement from the Coast Guard’s National Pollution Funds Center (NPFC). DNR will separately pay a projected $350,000 to break apart the vessel at a shipyard, a cost not eligible for NPFC funding.

While more than 5,000 gallons of oil products have been removed or recovered since the Deep Sea sank May 13 after a fire, an unknown quantity remains trapped on the vessel. Some of this oil floats out through small openings. Divers have plugged some of these, but accumulations of oil tend to reach new outlets. Removal of the Deep Sea will eliminate this problem and the risk of further oil releases.

The Washington State Department of Health closed all shellfish harvesting in Penn Cove on May 15. The closure will remain in effect until testing confirms shellfish from the area are safe to eat.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard's Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.
 


Wednesday, May 30, 2012 6:00 PM

Divers made progress as they worked in very soft silt to prepare to raise the sunken fishing vessel Deep Sea from the bottom of Penn Cove, near Coupeville on Whidbey Island. The vessel continued to release small amounts of oil, which formed thin coatings on waters nearby.

Divers for Global Diving and Salvage (Global), working under a contract with Ecology, reported today that they soon may complete a path for a “messenger line” under the hull at the center of ship. This will enable the placing of a heavy lifting chain. They previously completed a messenger line path under the stern. Installation of the lifting chains will mark a major milestone in the preparations.

National Response Corp.-Environmental Services (NRC-ES) crews continued to tend oil-spill containment boom and to deploy oil-spill cleanup materials in response to sheen – a thin oil coating – visible in surrounding waters. Most of the sheen was too thin to remove. The on-water crews received assistance from Ecology observers who made a helicopter flight this afternoon to help track sheen.

While more than 4,500 gallons of oil products have been removed or recovered since the Deep Sea sank May 13 after a fire, an unknown quantity remains trapped on the vessel. Some of this oil floats out through small openings. Divers have plugged some of these, but accumulations of oil tend to reach new outlets. Removal of the Deep Sea will eliminate this problem and the risk of further oil releases.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the U.S. Coast Guard, Washington departments of Ecology (Ecology) and Natural Resources (DNR), Island County Department of Emergency Management, Global and NRC-ES.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard’s Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.
 


Tuesday, May 29, 2012 6:00 PM

Contractors plan to begin raising the sunken fishing vessel Deep Sea off the bottom of Penn Cove, near Coupeville on Whidbey Island no sooner than Sunday, June 3. Divers have been preparing the vessel since Friday and will continue to do so through this week.

Great care continues to go into the salvage operation and environmental response. Preparations to raise any vessel often involve the unexpected. That is why it has been difficult to predict a specific time when this will occur.

A multi-agency unified command is coordinating the recovery effort. The command comprises the U.S. Coast Guard, Washington departments of Ecology (Ecology) and Natural Resources (DNR), Island County Department of Emergency Management, Global Diving & Salvage Inc. (Global) and NRC-Environmental Services (NRC-ES).

Divers for Global, working under a contract with Ecology, have cleared a path under the Deep Sea’s stern through which to pull a heavy lifting chain. The vessel rests on its left side, partially sunken in silt. Divers must dig a deeper hole for a second lifting chain under the vessel’s center. That second excavation will involve moving the equivalent of three dump truck loads of material.

The dive team has encountered machinery, hatch covers and other material that fell off the Deep Sea. Divers had to remove some of these objects, which had settled deeply into the muddy bottom, to allow digging of lifting chain passages.

Planners expect the 300-foot crane barge, D.B. General, to depart Seattle for Penn Cove late Saturday. It will right the vessel and then provide the bulk of the lifting power in tandem with a 140-foot crane barge, the D. B. Oakland, which arrived late Monday afternoon. The Oakland will help put lifting chains under the Deep Sea’s hull. The two cranes belong to General Construction Co.

The General is the region’s only crane barge large enough to bear the needed load to lift the sunken vessel. Even if the lift began in the next day or two, the operation may need more time than is available to return the crane to Seattle for a commitment on Saturday. As a result, the actual lifting will occur no earlier than Sunday, June 3, 2012.

Environmental teams today surveyed the cove by boat and helicopter. They observed small patches of oil sheen, a thin coating on the water’s surface, in the area around the site of the sunken vessel. The sheen is too thin to recover, and is dissipating by evaporation and wave action.

Earlier underwater operations – soon after the Deep Sea sank May 13 after a fire – have removed approximately 3,100 gallons of diesel oil from the vessel. Crews working on the surface have recovered about 1,400 gallons more. Small amounts of oil continue to leak from the Deep Sea. Responders are preparing to contain or recover oil that remains on board – in unknown quantities and locations – that could escape during the righting and lifting.

The Coast Guard has established a marine safety zone on waters within 200 yards of the Deep Sea. Vessels seeking to enter that zone must request permission from the Coast Guard’s Joint Harbor Operation Center at 206-217-6001 or from on-scene patrol craft on VHF radio channel 13.
 


Sunday, May 27, 2012 6:00 PM

The multi-agency effort to lift the Deep Sea continues through the Memorial Day weekend.

Global Diving & Salvage dive crews continued their work to prepare the 140-foot fishing vessel to be lifted from the cove.

Divers discovered when the vessel sank on May 13 it rolled and settled in 60-feet of water on its port (left) side. A tangle of debris fell also fell off the main deck and landed in the several feet of silt at the bottom of the cover.

It’s imperative that the dive teams work safely and carefully to ensure nothing goes wrong with the salvage operations. This means operations to raise the vessel won’t occur any sooner than Wednesday May 30.

Aerial flyovers have confirmed what on-water observers have been seeing: The Deep Sea is still leaking a small but continuous amount of oil – including diesel fuel and other petroleum products. The oil is mostly contained within the ring of containment boom on the water surface directly above the vessel.

Divers earlier removed 3,100 gallons of oil from the Deep Sea and another 1,400 gallons has been recovered from the water surface since the vessel sank. The oil is being removed from the water using absorbent materials inside the boom.

Ecology, DNR, U.S. Coast Guard, Island County Department of Emergency Management, Global Diving, and NRC-Environment Services have approved the plan to remove the Deep Sea and measures to protect environmental and economic resources when the vessel is lifted.

Once the vessel is lifted, it will be removed for disposal. Responders and planners are still working on the disposal plan.
 


Thursday, May 24, 2012 6:00 PM

Ecology’s contractor, Global Diving and Salvage, Inc. (Global) has begun to assemble a flotilla of specialized vessels to raise the Deep Sea. Preparations will continue at least until Monday but could take additional days, depending on sea floor conditions.

The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) is coordinating vessel removal operations with the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR), which owns the aquatic land where the Deep Sea was moored and sank.

Ecology, DNR and Global are completing plans for the vessel recovery. The Deep Sea still contains an unknown quantity of oil, small amounts of which continue to surface over the sunken ship. Oil-spill containment boom rings the area to contain such leaks.

Another Ecology contractor, NRC-Environmental Services (NRCES) tends this boom and uses oil-spill cleanup materials to recover sheen – a thin coating of oil on the surface – when it occurs.

On Wednesday, May 23, Global divers documented small releases of oil from the vessel. The team also attached a laminated legal notice from DNR onto the captain’s chair in the wheelhouse, as shown in the video. This is part of the process by which the state takes custody of an abandoned vessel. Click here for the wording in the notice and a link for more information from DNR about this process, which also includes publishing the notice in a newspaper.

Another diving team last week was unable to access all parts of the ship, including two fuel tanks that each can hold 3,000 gallons. Plans for raising the Deep Sea will include spill response preparations that, as a precaution, assume fuel remains in the tanks and in other locations.

A 62-foot Global diving support vessel, the Prudhoe Bay , should arrive late today in Penn Cove. On Friday, a dive team will begin to prepare the sea bottom under the Deep Sea for lifting the vessel. This work may require three or more days.

Dive teams will use water pumps to clear silt from beneath parts of the vessel and to remove silt that has accumulated inside. Waters near the site may take on a muddy color temporarily. The silt is not a pollutant and poses no threat to shellfish and other resources in Penn Cove.

Two large crane barges should arrive as early as Saturday, both owned by General Construction Co. The 300-foot D.B. General carries a 700-ton crane, and the 140-foot D.B. Oakland . The Deep Sea weighs 340 tons.

Ecology and its contractors continue, meanwhile, to monitor the boomed area and nearby waters and shores. At present there are no visible signs of oil along Penn Cove shores and no observations or reports of killed or injured fish, mammals or birds.
 


Wednesday, May 23, 2012 3:00 PM

Today, a dive team hired by Ecology is surveying the submerged wreck of the Deep Sea to aid in plans to raise the vessel. Since plans for the salvage operation are still being developed, there is no date set for raising the vessel.

Ecology has a standing salvage contract with Global Diving and Salvage Inc., which will conduct the salvage operation for the state.

The submerged vessel rests on state-owned aquatic lands managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Ecology and DNR seek a prompt and safe removal of the wreck because it likely contains an unknown amount of oil products and hazardous materials that could be released into the water as the steel structure rusts over time.

Meanwhile, environmental response crews hired by Ecology continue to tend and monitor oil-spill containment boom placed around the site of the wreck. The crews are removing small amounts of oil - that periodically floats up - from the wreck into the boomed area with oil-spill cleanup materials.
 


Monday, May 21, 2012 4:00 PM

Late Friday, May 18, diving teams, hired by the U.S. Coast Guard, completed underwater efforts to remove fuel from the vessel and survey the wreck. Ecology took over payments from the Coast Guard for an environmental cleanup contractor.

Contractors continue to tend oil-spill containment boom set around the site of the wreck of the Deep Sea. Small amounts of oil periodically float up from the sunken vessel into the boomed area. Crews monitor the area and remove these patches of oil with oil-spill cleanup materials.

A shoreline assessment conducted by Ecology on Sunday showed no evidence of oil observed. The survey team found a burned five-gallon metal container from the vessel with solid debris inside.

Ecology spill response staff remain on station at the scene, operating out of the Spills Program mobile incident command center at the public boat ramp in Coupeville.
 


Friday, May 18, 2012 4:00 PM

Divers made progress on completing their survey of the Deep Sea before suspending work for the day after windy conditions made continued diving unsafe. They found no sign of fuel in at least one of the three port side fuel tanks. The vents on the other two are embedded in sediment. Any oil in them cannot escape as the vessel presently rests on the bottom.

Divers will return tonight to check the engine room and stern hull.

Oil spill containment boom will remain deployed and tended around the site of the sunken vessel, and along commercial shellfish operations.

Ecology today provided 200 feet of boom lost by the Port of Coupeville when the Deep Sea sank on May 13.

Command post operations at a public boat launch in Coupeville will shift to an alternate location for Saturday to make way for a community boating festival.


Friday, May 18, 2012 12:00 PM

Today divers will attempt to open a hatch and access fuel tanks on the Deep Sea to determine if there is remaining fuel on board the sunken vessel. Water conditions are murky, limiting visibility is only 18-24 inches.

The vessel is resting on its port — or left — side. Divers have been working the starboard — or right — side collecting oil from a common vent system.

Updates:

  • 3,600 gallons of diesel fuel has been recovered so far — 3,100 gallons by divers and at least 500 gallons from absorbent materials on water’s surface.
  • It is unknown how much fuel was on the Deep Sea when it caught fire Saturday, May 12, and sank on Sunday, May 13.
  • Coast Guard is keeping an oil skimming vessel at the ready in case of any significant releases.
  • Ecology will conduct an aerial assessment later this afternoon.


Thursday, May 17, 2012 12:15 PM

A very strong wind that came into Penn Cove Tuesday May 15 helped dissipate the diesel fuel sheen that had been in the bay.

An aerial survey conducted mid-afternoon on Wednesday May 16 found only a few isolated patches of very thin sheen on the water, and boat inspections of the bay by Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife and Ecology couldn’t find any sheen by late afternoon. No sheen was found on the shoreline – although a Monday inspection did find a thin coating of fuel had touched the shoreline.

Divers have completely plugged the cracked vent on the Deep Sea and no new sheen is appearing inside the boom. The next step is planning dive operations into other parts of the vessel – including entering the vessel through a deck hatch. There is fuel caught in head spaces inside the hull, and steps will be taken to try and keep oil from floating loose work as divers work inside the vessel. It is unknown how long these operations will take.

Federal and state wildlife experts have determined that a seal body found on a nearby beach Wednesday was determined to have been dead for weeks – and its death unrelated to the spill.

No oiled fish, mammals or birds have been observed.


Wednesday, May 16, 2012 5:30 PM

Dive teams continue efforts to remove oil from a fishing vessel submerged since the weekend in Penn Cove, off Whidbey Island.

Divers hired by the U.S. Coast Guard are pumping fuel from tanks aboard the 128-foot former fishing vessel Deep Sea. The dive team continues to assess the vessel’s tanks – which together can hold more than 30,000 gallons — checking each for fuel.

Another Coast Guard contractor continues to maintain three rings of oil spill containment boom – 6,400 feet in total – around the site, and is using skimming equipment and other oil spill cleanup materials to remove oil contained in that area.

These combined efforts have recovered approximately 3,500 gallons of oil from the vessels tanks or the water.

Ecology and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continue to monitor environmental conditions along shoreline and on the water. The Coast Guard and Ecology have conducted or scheduled helicopter flights to provide additional monitoring of the spill and environmental conditions.

These surveys show that oil sheen – a thin coating of oil on the water surface, seen in the area on previous days – is no longer visible outside the boomed area.

A temporary shellfish harvesting closure, issued May 15 by the Washington Department of Health, remains in effect until further notice.

The Deep Sea sinking occurred on aquatic lands managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). DNR, through its Derelict Vessel Removal Program, is going out to bid to remove the vessel. The removal will be done to minimize the threat to the local environment and commercial, tribal and recreational shellfish resources, and preserves evidence that may be used in any investigation.

Spill response activities will continue as needed until the responders are certain that the release of oil, or threat of it, is curtailed.


Background:
May 12 through May 16, 2012 Ecology, U.S. Coast Guard, Camano Island Fire & Rescue, and North Whidbey Fire and Rescue responded to a boat fire on the anchored 128-foot fishing vessel Deep Sea, located in Penn Cove off Whidbey Island, Saturday May 12.

The Coast Guard received a report at 11:45 pm from Island County stating the Deep Sea was engulfed in flame. Attempts to put out the fire were stopped after water from firefighting efforts caused the Deep Sea to list, raising concerns additional water would cause it to sink.

The Coast Guard established a 500-yard safety zone and federal, state and local authorities allowed the vessel to burn.

On Sunday, May 14, the Deep Sea unexpected sank with an unknown amount of diesel fuel on board.

Oil skimming vessels placed oil containment boom around the area of the sunken vessel. The Coast Guard hired Ballard Diving & Salvage Co. to plug vents and seal the vessel’s fuel tanks.

However, a cracked vent allowed fuel to leak from the sunken vessel at an estimated rate of 2 gallons per minute. The following response equipment have been deployed:

  • 3 oil skimming vessels
  • 2 vacuum trucks
  • 2 dive times
  • 1 boom-tending vessel
  • Bales of absorbent material

Dive teams are working to siphon fuel from the Deep Sea’s external vents. After this operation is complete, teams will look for any remaining fuel located inside the vessel.

On May 14, some commercial shellfish operations in Penn Cove voluntarily stopped harvesting on before fuel reached nearby mussel rafts.

The volume of diesel spilled from the boat grew through Monday, leaving a very thin coating of oil over the commercial operation, leading the Washington Department of Health to close the area. Recreational shellfish harvesting in Penn Cove was also temporarily closed.

The oil sheen was too thin to remove from the water.

Ecology has been monitoring shoreline areas for potential environmental effects from the spill. Some sheen had reached the shore in places. Ecology is analyzing water samples collected help evaluate environmental impacts from the spill.

There have been no injured or killed mammals or fish observed or reported.

As of May 16, 4,400 feet of boom has been deployed and a total of 3,500 gallons of diesel fuel has been recovered.

The Washington Department of Natural Resources is developing options for salvaging the vessel once the Coast Guard and Ecology's environment assessment team have completed their work.

The Coast Guard has opened the federal Oil Spill Liability Fund to pay for response efforts.

Photo Gallery


Video Gallery

Exploring the Deep Sea: A diver’s-eye view of the outer hull of the Deep Sea, shot on May 23, 2012.


Oil leak on the Deep Sea: From a diver’s helmet camera, we see a dark brown stream of oil flowing up from a spot on the Deep Sea, May 23, 2012. The diver is horizontal, so “up” is to the left. The stream breaks up into globules before the diver moves on. This one of the sources of surface sheen, contained by boom floating over the sunken vessel.


On Wednesday, May 23, Global divers documented small releases of oil from the vessel. The team also attached a laminated legal notice from DNR onto the captain’s chair in the wheelhouse, as shown in the video.


 


 


 


 

 

 


 

Incident name:
FV Deep Sea Fire

Date of Incident:
May 12, 2012 – fire aboard fishing vessel Deep Sea broke out at 11:45 pm

May 13, 2012 - Vessel sank at 6 pm

Location:
Penn Cove, near Town of Coupeville, Island County, WA

Product/Quantity:

Unknown quantity diesel fuel, other oil products still on vessel

Oil recovered / removed:

  • 3,100 gallons of oil recovered during underwater operations.
  • 1,400 gallons recovered from surface using absorbent pads and boom.
     

Cause:
Fire and flooding – fire cause of under investigation

Responsible Party:
Rory Westmoreland, owner Deep Sea
Vessel has been turned over to DNR


BLOG POSTINGS

June 6, 2012
June 5, 2012
June 4, 2012 (6:28 PM)
June 3, 2012 (9:50 PM)
June 3, 2012 (4:00 PM)
June 3, 2012 (1:45 PM)
June 3, 2012 (11:32 AM)
June 3, 2012
June 2, 2012
May 31, 2012
May 30, 2012
May 29, 2012
May 28, 2012
May 27, 2012
May 26, 2012
 

NEWS RELEASES

Washington Dept of Ecology:
June 4, 2012
June 3, 2012
June 2, 2012
June 1, 2012
May 25, 2012
May 23, 2012
May 21, 2012
May 18, 2012
May 17, 2012
May 16, 2012
 

Washington Department of Health:
June 8, 2012
June 5, 2012
 

Washington Department of Natural Resources:
June 7, 2012
May 22, 2012
May 14, 2012
 

U.S. Coast Guard:
May 15
May 14
May 13 (p.m.)
May 13 (a.m.)

MEDIA CONTACTS

Larry Altose, Dept. of Ecology
206-920-2600
larry.altose@ecy.wa.gov

13th Coast Guard District Public Affairs office:
(206) 220-7237

Donn Moyer,
Dept. of Health:
(360)-786-2537 (pager)

Bryan Flint,
Dept. of Natural Resources
(360) 902-1023