Footnotes to Table 830-1 and its extracts  



Footnotes:

(1) The following petroleum products are common examples of GRO: automotive and aviation gasolines, mineral spirits, stoddard solvents, and naphtha. To be in this range, 90 percent of the petroleum components need to be quantifiable using the NWTPH-Gx; if NWTPH-HCID results are used for this determination, then 90 percent of the "area under the TPH curve" must be quantifiable using NWTPH-Gx. Products such as jet fuel, diesel No. 1, kerosene, and heating oil may require analysis as both GRO and DRO depending on the range of petroleum components present (range can be measured by NWTPH-HCID). (See footnote 17 on analytical methods.)

(2) The following petroleum products are common examples of DRO: Diesel No. 2, fuel oil No. 2, light oil (including some bunker oils). To be in this range, 90 percent of the petroleum components need to be quantifiable using the NWTPH-Dx quantified against a diesel standard. Products such as jet fuel, diesel No. 1, kerosene, and heating oil may require analysis as both GRO and DRO depending on the range of petroleum components present as measured in NWTPH-HCID.

(3) The following petroleum products are common examples of the heavy oil group: Motor oils, lube oils, hydraulic fluids, etc. Heavier oils may require the addition of an appropriate oil range standard for quantification.

(4) Mineral oil means non-PCB mineral oil, typically used as an insulator and coolant in electrical devices such as transformers and capacitors.

(5) The waste oil category applies to waste oil, oily wastes, and unknown petroleum products and mixtures of petroleum and nonpetroleum substances. Analysis of other chemical components (such as solvents) than those listed may be required based on site-specific information. Mixtures of identifiable petroleum products (such as gasoline and diesel, or diesel and motor oil) may be analyzed based on the presence of the individual products, and need not be treated as waste and unknown oils.

(6) When using Method A, testing soil for benzene is required. Furthermore, testing ground water for BTEX is necessary when a petroleum release to ground water is known or suspected. If the ground water is tested and toluene, ethyl benzene or xylene is in the ground water above its respective Method A cleanup level, the soil must also be tested for that chemical. When using Method B or C, testing the soil for BTEX is required and testing for BTEX in ground water is required when a release to ground water is known or suspected.

(7)(a) For DRO releases from other than home heating oil systems, follow the instructions for GRO releases in Footnote (6).

(b) For DRO releases from typical home heating oil systems (systems of 1,100 gallons or less storing heating oil for residential consumptive use on the premises where stored), testing for BTEX is not usually required for either ground water or soil. Testing of the ground water is also not usually required for these systems; however, if the ground water is tested and benzene is found in the ground water, the soil must be tested for benzene.

(8) Testing is required in a sufficient number of samples to determine whether this chemical is present at concentrations of concern. If the chemical is found to be at levels below the applicable cleanup level, then no further analysis is required.

(9) Testing for n-hexane is required when VPH analysis is performed for Method B or C. In this case, the concentration of n-hexane should be deleted from its respective fraction to avoid double-counting its concentration. n-Hexane's contribution to overall toxicity is then evaluated using its own reference dose.

(10) Volatile fuel additives (such as dibromoethane, 1-2 (EDB) (CAS# 106-93-4) and dichloroethane, 1-2 (EDC) (CAS# 107-06-2)) must be part of a volatile organics analysis (VOA) of GRO contaminated ground water. If any is found in ground water, then the contaminated soil must also be tested for these chemicals.

(11) Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) (CAS# 1634-04-4) must be analyzed in GRO contaminated ground water. If any is found in ground water, then the contaminated soil must also be tested for MTBE.

(12)(a) For automotive gasoline where the release occurred prior to 1996 (when "leaded gasoline" was used), testing for lead is required unless it can be demonstrated that lead was not part of the release. If this demonstration cannot be made, testing is required in a sufficient number of samples to determine whether lead is present at concentrations of concern. Other additives and blending compounds of potential environmental significance may need to be considered for testing, including: tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA); tertiary-amyl methyl ether (TAME); ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE); ethanol; and methanol. Contact the department for additional testing recommendations regarding these and other additives and blending compounds.

(b) For aviation gasoline, racing fuels and similar products, testing is required for likely fuel additives (especially lead) and likely blending compounds, no matter when the release occurred.

(13) Testing for carcinogenic PAHs is required for DRO and heavy oils, except for the following products for which adequate information exists to indicate their absence: Diesel No. 1 and 2, home heating oil, kerosene, jet fuels, and electrical insulating mineral oils. The carcinogenic PAHs include benzo(a)pyrene, chrysene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)anthracene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene.

(14)(a) Except as noted in (b) and (c), testing for the non-carcinogenic PAHs, including the "naphthalenes" (naphthalene, 1-methyl-naphthalene, and 2-methyl-naphthalene) is not required when using Method A cleanup levels, because they are included in the TPH cleanup level.

(b) Testing of soil for naphthalenes is required under Methods B and C when the inhalation exposure pathway is evaluated.

(c) If naphthalenes are found in ground water, then the soil must also be tested for naphthalenes.

(15) Testing for PCBs is required unless it can be demonstrated that: (1) the release originated from an electrical device manufactured for use in the United States after July 1, 1979; (2) oil containing PCBs was never used in the equipment suspected as the source of the release (examples of equipment where PCBs are likely to be found include transformers, electric motors, hydraulic systems, heat transfer systems, electromagnets, compressors, capacitors, switches and miscellaneous other electrical devices); or, (3) the oil released was recently tested and did not contain PCBs.

(16) Testing for other possible chemical contaminants may be required based on site-specific information.

(17) The analytical methods NWTPH-Gx, NWTPH-Dx, NWTPH-HCID, VPH, and EPH are methods published by the Department of Ecology and available on the department's Internet web site.

 

[Footnotes to Table 830-1] [Other Compounds] [Fuel Additives and Blending Compounds] [Other Petroleum Compounds] [Volatile Petroleum Compounds] 

[Area Calculation Aid] [Aerial Photo with Area Designations] [TEE Table 749-1] [TEE Table 749-2] [TEE Table 749-3] [TEE Table 749-4] [TEE Table 749-5] [TEE Table 830-1]  [Exclusions Main] [TEE Definitions] [Simplified or Site-Specific?] [Simplified Ecological Evaluation] [Site-Specific Ecological Evaluation] [WAC 173-340-7493] 

[TEE Home]