Kingfisher - Copyright by Sandra NoelA Citizen's Guide to Understanding and Monitoring Lakes and Streams

Table of Contents


This manual was originally published in 1991 and some of the information may now be out of date.

A PDF file of this manual is available. Click here to print your own copy.

Also see EPA's volunteer lake monitoring information

A Word from the Author

Acknowledgements

Introduction

CHAPTER ONE - Who Cares About Monitoring

Different Monitoring Strategies
Who Monitors What in Puget Sound?
The Advantages of Citizen's Monitoring
The Value of Your Efforts

CHAPTER TWO - Lakes

The Physical Character of Lakes
Lake Water Quality Parameters
     Temperature
      Dissolved Oxygen
      pH
      Secchi Disk Depth
      Nutrient Concentrations
      Total Suspended Solids and Turbidity
     Chlorophyll a
      Fecal Coliform Bacteria Concentrations
A Typical Lake Monitoring Program
Example of Lake Monitoring Strategies
How to Report and Analyze Lake Water Quality Data

CHAPTER THREE - Streams

The Physical Character of Streams
Stream Water Quality Parameters
     Temperature
     Dissolved Oxygen
     pH
     Nutrients
     Total Suspended Solids and Turbidity
     Fecal Coliform Bacteria
Pollutant Concentrations Versus Pollutant Loading
Developing a Stream Monitoring Program
How to Report and Analyze Stream Water Quality Data

CHAPTER FOUR - From the Field to the Lab

What Makes Good Data?
Ground Rules
Collecting the Sample
     Measuring Temperature
     Measuring Dissolved Oxygen
     Measuring pH
     Measuring Secchi Disk Depth
     Measuring Nutrients
     Measuring Total Suspended Solids and Turbidity
     Measuring Chlorophyll a
    Measuring Fecal Coliform Bacteria

Chapter Five - Getting a Handle on Hydrology

Measuring Stream Flow
    Measuring Steam Flow with a Meter
    Measuring Stream Flow with a Simple Float
Using a Staff Gage
Forming a Stage/Discharge Relationship
Calculating Pollutant Loads