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Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

GIS Applications

Ecology uses geographic information system (GIS) tools and procedures as aids in accomplishing its mission of protecting the land, air, and waters of the state. The agency has built and maintains the GIS applications described here in order to help our staff and others understand the diverse natural and cultural environment we live and work in. As a public service, we are making our GIS applications available here.


Web Browser Applications

  • Air Quality Monitoring
    • This database provides near real-time air quality information to protect health. It's used to determine if air quality meets health-based federal standards.
  • Coastal Atlas Map
    • Information about Washington’s marine shorelines and the land areas near Puget Sound, the outer coast, and the estuarine portion of the Columbia River, including public access and beach closures. The Coastal Atlas includes information about:
  • Columbia River Mainstem - Water Resources Information System (WEBMAP)
    • Mapped water rights, place of use, diversions, stream flows, metering, and water right documents.
  • Environmental Information Management (EIM)
  • Facility/Site Identification (F/SID) System
    • Information on facilities and sites of interest to the Department of Ecology.
  • Lakes
    • View Washington State lake data including aquatic plants, toxic algae, herbicide use, fish management, grants and loans and more.
  • Polluted Waters - 303(d) Listing
    • View the water bodies listed under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act by the Washington State Department of Ecology as violating clean water standards.
  • Shoreline Aerial Photos
    • A collection of over 95,000 oblique aerial photos of Washington’s shorelines. The first set is from the 1970’s and focused on Washington's 2,500 miles of marine shoreline; the most recent sets travel inland, covering the lakes and rivers of Eastern Washington.
  • Smelter Search
    • Searchable map of areas with arsenic soil contamination from former smelters in Tacoma and Everett. Impacted areas include parts of Thurston, Pierce, King, and Snohomish counties.
  • Spills Map Series
    • A series of maps communicating spill risks and planning processes in Washington State, including:  Response plans, past incidents, oil trains, facilities, equipment and more.
  • Water Quality Atlas
    • The WQ Atlas is a web based map application being developed for both Ecology staff and external users to obtain information about water quality in Washington State. It will incorporate Ecology’s most significant surface water information into one searchable tool. This will include data for many of Ecology’s delegated responsibilities under the Clean Water Act: WQ standards, Assessment Waters, Permits/Outfalls, and the Improvement Project (TMDLs).
  • Water Resources Explorer
    • Water Rights and Wells web site that provides access through an interactive map to information maintained by the Water Resources Program (Program) within the Department of Ecology as well as links to other water resource related information.
  • Watershed Characterization
    • Water and habitat assessments that compare areas within a watershed for restoration and protection value. It is a coarse-scale tool that supports decisions regarding where efforts should be focused and What types of actions to take at that place.
  • Washington State Well Report Viewer
    • Information on the location, ownership, construction details, and lithology of completed wells.
  • Water Quality Assessment for Washington
    • View the water bodies listed under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act by the Washington State Department of Ecology as violating clean water standards.


Questions/Comments about GIS applications at Ecology? Contact:

Christina Kellum
GIS Manager
Washington State Department of Ecology
P.O. Box 47600
Olympia, Washington  98504-7600

Phone: (360) 407-6088
Fax: (360) 407-6493
E-Mail: christina.kellum@ecy.wa.gov


Page maintained and last updated on Friday, October 27, 2017 16:05 by Rich Kim